Speed dating torbay

Andrew confirms that the association of the Pace family with the Salvation Army was very long term indeed, & is so in Australia today (in early 2009).' Is it possible that you have data about this most interesting matter? 1865, Colonel Arthur Robson joined the firm, which then became 'Blumer and Company'. The above links are mainly to vessel arrival records.

It would seem that Colonel Robson was the major supplier of timber to the firm & indeed financed it. The company earned a reputation for building fine ships, & for being safe - not a life lost re any of the 40 ships it built in its first 10 years. 98.3 ft long, crew of 9 or 10, signal letters QBHG. The vessel arrived at Onehunga, Auckland, NZ, from Hobart Town, Tasmania, on May 12, 1864, with a varied cargo. 13, 1869, voyage from Melbourne to Sydney, New South Wales.

The business was at that location until 1864, when Mr. Thompson took over the 'Blumer' site on North Sands (from 1891 source above). ) was the GGG grandfather of Larry Wailing, Aron Mc Intyre's father in law. And we now know, thanks to Ray Ranns, that the award to Richard Cumming, foreman plater, was referenced in the 'Sunderland Daily Echo and Shipping Gazette', of Oct. Should you have an interest in acquiring the watch, or wish to learn more about it. Only modest info is WWW available - of her sad end.

John Blumer moved his shipbuilding business to the north end of North Dock. John Blumer was a most religious man, it would appear, & was a pillar of the Non Conformist Church, which flourished in the industrial towns as a reaction to poverty & the evils of drink. you might contact the webmaster who will gladly put you in contact with its owner. Vessel was out of Hull (or Aberdeen), when on May 16, 1869, with i) Captain W. The sinking of Zetus, swiftly broken up by the mountainous waves, was witnessed by 'Donald', mate of Margaret, which vessel suffered the same fate, Donald being the sole survivor.

And they built 10 vessels during the short lifetime of the firm. The webmaster has many editions of Lloyd's Register available to him ex 'Google' books, thru 1885/86 - see left. Stafford, later (1870 & 1880) Francis Stafford, both of Blyth). But Bill Heatley indicates that vessel, with ancestor William Heatley in command (he drowned), was in fact sunk off Queensland in 1891. It would be good to link to an image, the oil painting, perhaps! Ray Ranns advises me that a new hull numbering series was commenced when the move was made to North Dock. Which ceased to exist at or about the time that George Blumer died in 1867. The vessel's initial owner was 'Gregory & Co.', of Blyth, intended for use, it would appear, in the Baltic & Mediterranean trades. Now Luke Blumer (2) was the fifth son of Luke Blumer (1757/1840) (1), the son of a blacksmith from Soho, London. Initially registered, presumably in error, as 'Matfon' - an 1861/62 typo! The image shows James Fraser (1867/1941), Malcolm's grandfather, a 'freelance mast maker'. At present, I list only six vessels built by 'Blumer' at North Sands. Photographed with a set of his masts during assembly at Blumers North Dock yard & standing where 'Brunel Drive' is today. You should know, however, that Michael Orpin of Jersey, whose wife is descended from Luke Blumer (Darlington branch), is also researching the family & yard histories.

Leave a Reply